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The Bachelor of Science in Computer Engineering is a 4-year undergraduate curriculum that aims at producing the best-skilled, hands-on, practicing computer engineers. More specifically, the objectives of this academic program are (1) to provide students with the technical knowledge and skills that will enable them to achieve a successful career in the computer engineering profession; (2) to provide students with a general education that will enable them to appreciate the social, ethical, economic, and environmental dimensions of problems they may face; (3) to develop communication and social skills necessary to work effectively with others; (4) to develop the students’ ability to solve problems by learning what is already known and then utilizing logic and creativity to come up with optimal solutions; and (5) to provide students with the intellectual skills necessary to continue learning and to stay current with the profession as it changes.

Course information

English requirements (9 credits)

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course is an overview of expository writing, including the development and revision of paragraphs and essays using various rhetorical strategies, as well as reading and discussion of selected essays, short stories and poems. In addition, the course introduces writing about literature, incorporation and documentation of material from primary sources.

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course emphasizes documented critical writing based on an introduction to fiction, drama, and poetry. 

Prerequisite: ENGL 101

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course emphasizes on techniques for communicating successfully through sound, honest written and oral business messages. The content is directed primarily to careers that involve precise writing skills, as well as general strategies involved in job related functions.

Arab Heritage Requirements (6 credits)

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course introduces the general principles of Arab Heritage and Language.

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course introduces the general principles of the modern history of Bahrain.

Mathematics Requirements (6 credits)

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course introduces functions limits and continuity, derivatives of functions of one variable, application of the derivative, related rates, maximum and minimum values, the mean value theorem, the integral and indefinite integrals and integration rules, inverse functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, inverse trigonometric functions, hyperbolic functions, and L’Hospital’s rule.

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course involves the applications and techniques of integration, including integration by substitution, integration by parts and integration by partial fractions, application of integration and parametric equations and polar coordinates.

Science Requirements (8 credits)

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
1
Total:
4

This course introduces the general principles of chemistry with emphasis on inorganic materials.

Prerequisites: High school chemistry and 2 years of high school algebra

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course provides an overview of the fundamental principles of physics in areas of mechanics and oscillatory motion. Topics include standards and units, vectors and coordinate systems, kinematics, dynamics of work energy and power, conservation of energy, dynamics of system of particles, collisions, rotational kinematics and dynamics, equilibrium of rigid bodies, and oscillations. The course is designed for students requiring calculus-based physics.

Prerequisites: High school physics and MATH 151

Social Science Requirements (9 credits)

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course introduces the general principles of Global Human Rights.

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

The course is a survey of topics such as research methodology, biological bases of behavior, perception, motivation and emotion, learning and memory, development, intelligence, personality, mental disturbance, and social influence.

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course provides a broad overview of sociology and how it applies to everyday life. Major theoretical perspectives and concepts are presented, including sociological imagination, culture, deviance, inequality, social change, and social structure. Students also explore the influence of social class and social institutions, such as churches, education, healthcare, government, economy, and environment. The family as a social structure is also examined.

Core Requirements ( 17 credits)

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course is an introduction to the concept of modeling and basic principles of rigid bodies, equivalent systems of forces, equilibrium of rigid bodies, analysis of planar rigid body systems, distributed forces, normal and shear forces and moment diagrams, and virtual work principle. Prerequisite: PHYS 101

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course introduces computer organization and operation. Topics include binary representation of information, fundamentals of computer programming using a C family language, data types, selection and iteration structures, functions, arrays, pointers, scope and duration of variables and the systematic design and development of computer programs. Prerequisite: MATH 151

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course involves selected topics—from ordinary differential equations, the Laplace transform, Fourier series, and linear algebra—with engineering applications. Prerequisite: MATH 151

Lecture:
4
Laboratory:
0
Total:
4

This course emphasizes on vector functions (continuity, derivatives, and integrals), parametric curves and surfaces, polar coordinates, as well as functions of several variables (including continuity and partial derivatives, gradient, directional derivatives). Topics also include the chain rule, double and triple integrals, iterated integrals, integration using polar, cylindrical, and spherical coordinates, change of variables, line and surface integrals (including surface area), curl and divergence, and the integral theorems of Green, Stokes, and Gauss. Prerequisites: MATH 151 and MATH 152

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

The course provides an overview of the fundamental principles of physics in areas of electricity and magnetism. Topics include electric field, Gauss law, electric potential, capacitance and dielectrics, current and resistance, direct current circuits, magnetic fields, sources of magnetic fields, Faraday’s law, inductance, alternating current circuits, and electromagnetic waves. The course is designed for students requiring calculus-based physics. Prerequisites: MATH 152 and PHYS 101

Major Lower Level Requirements (21 credits)

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
1
Total:
4

This course focuses on modeling, analysis, and design of digital systems, primarily at the logic design level. Topics also include combinational and sequential networks. Prerequisite: MATH 152

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course provides an overview of the organization and operation of computer hardware and software. Topics also include operating system shell and services, program design and development, input-output programming, multimodule and mixed-language programming, and assembler and C language. Prerequisites: CMPE 160 and CMPE 270

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course provides an overview of circuit analysis by reduction methods, source transformations, and mesh and nodal analysis. Topics also include operational amplifier model, transient analysis, alternating current circuits, impedance, power, phasor diagrams, and three-phase balanced networks, as well as computer programming and application of computer software for circuit analysis. Prerequisites: MATH 152 and PHYS 102

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course focuses on logic, methods of proof, set theory, number theory, equivalence and order relations, counting (combinations and permutations), and solving recurrence relations. Prerequisite: MATH 151

Lecture:
4
Laboratory:
0
Total:
4

This course is a survey of systems of linear equations and matrices, Gauss elimination, matrices, matrix operations, inverses, elementary matrices, diagonal and triangular matrices, symmetric, skew symmetric matrices, determinants of square matrices, vectors in 2- and 3-dimensional space, norm, dot product, cross product, lines, planes, Euclidean vector spaces, linear mappings between Euclidean spaces, properties of linear mappings, general vector spaces, subspaces, linear independency, base and dimension, row, column and null spaces, rank and nullity, inner product, angle, orthogonality, Gramm-Schmidt process, change of basis, orthogonal matrices, eigenvalues, eigenvectors, linear transformations, Kernel, range, isomorphism and inverse linear transformations. Prerequisite: MATH 151

Lecture:
4
Laboratory:
0
Total:
4

This course is an introduction to probability, operations on sets, counting problems, definition of probability, conditional probability, Bayes' theorem, one- and two-dimensional random variables, mathematical expectation and variance, basic discrete and continuous probability distributions, moment generating functions, law of large numbers, and limit theorem. Prerequisite: MATH 151

Major Upper Level Requirements (36 credits)

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course focuses on graphical user interface programming, including dialog boxes, menus, toolbars, status bars, fonts, icons and bitmaps. Content also involves event-driven programming, processes, event message processing, timers, on-idle processing, multithreaded programming and C++ Windows-class libraries, such as integrated development environments, application framework and document view architecture. Prerequisites: CMPE 160 and CMPE 271

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course focuses on embedded system architecture. Topics include IO programming using parallel ports, serial ports, timers, and D/A and A/D converters, as well as interrupts and real-time programming, program development and debugging tools and C language and assembler. Prerequisites: CMPE 271

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
1
Total:
4

This course puts emphasis on object-oriented software development, classes, inheritance, design by abstraction, design patterns, object-oriented application framework and introduction to concurrent and distributed computing. Prerequisites: CMPE 160 and CMPE 361

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course focuses on the design of digital electronic systems using commercially available high-speed digital devices and circuits. Prerequisite: CMPE 270

Lecture:
0
Laboratory:
1
Total:
1

This course is a hands-on experience in characterization and application of standard digital integrated circuit devices. Co-requisites: CMPE 470 and Prerequisite: ELEC 330L

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course emphasizes on business design, memory design, interrupt structure and input/output for microprocessor-based systems. Prerequisites: CMPE 375 and CMPE 470

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

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Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

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Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course focuses on transient and frequency response of RLC circuits, mutual inductance, network analysis using Laplace transformations, network functions, stability, convolution integrals, Bode diagrams, two-port networks, and computer analysis of circuits. The course requires filing an approved master plan with the department chair. Prerequisites: ELEC 210 and MATH 252

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

The course is the application of diodes, JFETs, MOSFETs, and BJTs in typical electronic circuits. Content also includes analysis and design of rectifiers, filters, and simple amplifiers using transistors and operational amplifiers. Prerequisite: ELEC 210

Lecture:
0
Laboratory:
1
Total:
1

This course involves the experimental study of laboratory instruments, diodes, rectifier circuits, filters, transistors, and operational amplifiers. Prerequisite/concurrent: ELEC 330

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

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Professional Elective Options (12 credits)

Students pursuing the Bachelor of Science in Computer Engineering must complete a minimum of 12 elective credits per the following:

  • One approved elective course in mathematics (3 credits)
  • Three engineering elective courses (9 credits):

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

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3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

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3
Laboratory:
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Total:
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3
Laboratory:
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Total:
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Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

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Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
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Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

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Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

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Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course focuses on modeling concepts, linear programming, problem formulation, simplex and dual-simplex methods, duality and sensitivity analysis, transportation, transshipment and assignment problems, integer programming, cutting plane algorithms, and branch and bound techniques.

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course focuses on human protection systems, emergency and accident handling, hazard identification techniques, safety vs reliability and systems safety quantification

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course focuses on materials and properties. Topics also include atomic bonding and arrangements, structural imperfections, atom movements, deformation of materials, physical properties, industrial alloys, modification of properties of materials through changes in structure, and nonmetallic materials. (This course is for non-mechanical engineering students.) Prerequisite: CHEM 201

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This data science course is an introduction to machine learning and algorithms. You will develop a basic understanding of the principles of machine learning and derive practical solutions using predictive analytics. We will also examine why algorithms play an essential role in Big Data analysis.