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Why Computer Engineering?

Perhaps the most in-demand skillset in today’s tech-centric world, Computer Engineering and its application across all industries is changing the way we experience life and is evolving rapidly. We want to place our students at the forefront of the telecommunications, networks, and electronics industries. Our versatile graduates can go on to a multitude of careers in the technological development of practically any sector.

Who Should Apply?

This 4-year undergraduate program produces dynamic computer engineers who enjoy working collaboratively and can adapt to the constant change of the industry. If you love to experiment and have a passion for technology, then computer engineering is for you. Applicants to this degree program will need a strong basis in mathematics, sciences, electronics and computing basics, and need to be able to self-evaluate throughout their studies.

Program Content

In the first year, this program tackles core principles of engineering mechanics, calculus, algebra and physics, homing in on the basics of computer organization and operation. As students advance, more complex elements of digital systems, electronics, networking and security are examined. Computer Engineering is one of our most flexible programs, giving students the opportunity to select from their choice of professional electives, with innovative options such as Web Programming, Circuit Design, Safety Engineering and Materials Science.

A key element of this program is the internship, which allows students to apply their learning in a real-world scenario, spending one month with one of AUBH’s partner organizations. Graduates of this course will find themselves as work-ready computer scientists, with potential careers in every area of life and commerce.

Program requirements

Program name Total Number of Credits
Bachelor of Science in Computer Engineering
124
Credits

Course information

English Requirements (9 credits)

ENGL 101 - Composition I

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course is an overview of expository writing, including the development and revision of paragraphs and essays using various rhetorical strategies, as well as reading and discussion of selected essays, short stories and poems. In addition, the course introduces writing about literature, incorporation and documentation of material from primary sources.

ENGL 102 - Composition II

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course introduces the conventions of research writing and teaches the process of producing well-planned research papers using critical thinking and analytical skills in response to a variety of academic texts. The course is designed to provide guidance in all steps of the research process including choosing a topic, designing a research methodology, analyzing data, and writing up and presenting results.

Prerequisite: ENGL 101

ENGL 205 - Business English

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course emphasizes on techniques for communicating successfully through sound, honest written and oral business messages. The content is directed primarily to careers that involve precise writing skills, as well as general strategies involved in job related functions.

Arab Heritage Requirements (6 credits)

ARHG 101 - Arab Heritage I - Language

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course aims at developing the language skills of native speakers of Arabic, by providing the students with a comprehensive knowledge of the linguistic system. It is intended to help students attain proficiency by expanding vocabulary and providing paragraph-level activities in reading, writing, and speaking; through a selection texts by writers from across the Arab world.

ARHG 102 - Arab Heritage II - Modern History of Bahrain

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course introduces the spatial character and history of Bahrain, including the ancient and Islamic eras, and Arabic and Islamic dimensions of the identity of Bahrain  until the modern state and the development of the constitutional life in Bahrain, it also presents the philosophy of citizenship and the fundamental values of Bahrain’s society and citizenship rights ,duties and responsibilities.

Mathematics Requirements (6 credits)

MATH 151 - Calculus I

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course introduces functions limits and continuity, derivatives of functions of one variable, application of the derivative, related rates, maximum and minimum values, the mean value theorem, the integral and indefinite integrals and integration rules, inverse functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, inverse trigonometric functions, hyperbolic functions, and L’Hospital’s rule. 

MATH 152 - Calculus II

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course involves the applications and techniques of integration, including integration by substitution, integration by parts and integration by partial fractions, application of integration, parametric equations and polar coordinates, convergence of sequences and series, Power Series and approximation using Taylor Series.

Prerequisite: MATH 151

Science Requirements (8 credits)

CHEM 101 - General Chemistry 1

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
1
Total:
4

This course introduces the general principles of chemistry with emphasis on inorganic materials.  This course will provide students with a comprehensive overview of the major areas of chemistry.  The topics covered range from the atomic theory to the descriptions of chemical reactivity and reactions, quantitative methods in chemistry, reactions in aqueous media and chemical bonding. Prerequisites: High school chemistry and 2 years of high school algebra.

PHYS 101 - Principles of Physics

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course will provide students with a comprehensive overview of the some of the major areas of physics. Topics covered range from measurements and error analysis of physical dimensions to understand the concepts of motions and forces in one, two and three dimensions, free fall acceleration, kinetic, potential and conservation of energy.

Prerequisites: MATH 151

Social Science Requirements (9 credits)

ARHG 103 - Global Human Rights

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course introduces the basic principles and the definition of human rights with an emphasis on the International Convention of human rights. It aims to reflect current developments and questions arising in international human rights law, to communicate debates and arguments concerning human rights, and to analyze the application of international human rights principles in the context of Bahrain.

PSYC 100 - Introduction to Psychology

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

Psychology is a field focused on scientifically understanding how humans think, feel, and act. This course will introduce you to the basic concepts and research within the field of psychology and hopefully it will allow you to gain a better understanding of the self and others. The course will cover a wide range of topics such as research methodology, biological bases of behavior, perception, motivation and emotion, learning and memory, development, intelligence, personality and social influence.

SOSC 100 - Introduction to Sociology

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course provides a broad overview of sociology and how it applies to everyday life. Major theoretical perspectives and concepts are presented, including sociological imagination, culture, deviance, inequality, social change, and social structure. Students also explore the influence of social class and social institutions, such as churches, education, healthcare, government, economy, and environment. The family as a social structure is also examined.

Core Requirements (17 credits)

CIVL 200 - Engineering Mechanics – Statics

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course is an introduction to the concept of modeling and basic principles of rigid bodies, equivalent systems of forces, equilibrium of rigid bodies, analysis of planar rigid body systems, distributed forces, normal and shear forces and moment diagrams, and virtual work principle. Prerequisite: PHYS 101

CMPE 160 - Introduction to Computer Programming and Applications

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course introduces computer organization and operation. Topics include binary representation of information, fundamentals of computer programming using a C family language, data types, selection and iteration structures, functions, arrays, pointers, scope and duration of variables and the systematic design and development of computer programs.

ENGR 201 - Methods of Analysis

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course involves selected analytical and numerical methods for solving problems from various engineering fields: Solution of initial and boundary value problems, series solutions, Laplace transforms, and nonlinear equations; numerical methods for solving ordinary differential equations, accuracy of numerical methods, linear stability theory, and finite differences. This course also introduces a programming basic tool for computation problems with engineering applications.

Prerequisite: MATH 151

MATH 252 - Calculus III

Lecture:
4
Laboratory:
0
Total:
4

This course emphasizes on vector functions (continuity, derivatives, and integrals), parametric curves and surfaces, polar coordinates, as well as functions of several variables (including continuity and partial derivatives, gradient, directional derivatives). Topics also include the chain rule, double and triple integrals, iterated integrals, integration using polar, cylindrical, and spherical coordinates, change of variables, line and surface integrals (including surface area), curl and divergence, and the integral theorems of Green, Stokes, and Gauss. Prerequisites: MATH 151 and MATH 152

PHYS 102 - Principles of Physics II

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

The course provides an overview of the fundamental principles of physics in areas of electricity and magnetism. Topics include electric field, Gauss law, electric potential, capacitance and dielectrics, current and resistance, direct current circuits, magnetic fields, sources of magnetic fields, Faraday’s law, inductance, alternating current circuits, and electromagnetic waves. The course is designed for students requiring calculus-based physics. Prerequisites: MATH 152 and PHYS 101

Major Lower Level Requirements (21 credits)

CMPE 270 - Digital Systems

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
1
Total:
4

This course focuses on modeling, analysis, and design of digital systems, primarily at the logic design level. Digital electronic topics include: the basic logic gates, Boolean algebra, number systems, digital arithmetic, combinational logic circuits, multiplexers, decoders and flip-flops and registers. Digital system applications will include counters, magnitude comparators, Analog-to-Digital and Digital-to-Analog conversions, and memory units: Random Access Memories, and Sequential Access Memories.

Prerequisite: MATH 152

CMPE 271 - Computer Organization

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course provides an overview of the organization and operation of computer hardware and software. Topics also include operating system shell and services, program design and development, input-output programming, multimodule and mixed-language programming, and assembler and C language. Prerequisites: CMPE 160 and CMPE 270

ELEC 210 - Circuit Analysis I

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course provides an overview of circuit analysis by reduction methods, source transformations, and mesh and nodal analysis. Topics also include operational amplifier model, transient analysis, alternating current circuits, impedance, power, phasor diagrams, and three-phase balanced networks, as well as computer programming and application of computer software for circuit analysis. Prerequisites: MATH 152 and PHYS 102

MATH 203 - Discrete Mathematics

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course focuses on logic, methods of proof, set theory, number theory, equivalence and order relations, counting (combinations and permutations), and solving recurrence relations. Prerequisite: MATH 151

MATH 254 - Introduction to Linear Algebra

Lecture:
4
Laboratory:
0
Total:
4

This course is a survey of systems of linear equations and matrices, Gauss elimination, matrices, matrix operations, inverses, elementary matrices, diagonal and triangular matrices, symmetric, skew symmetric matrices, determinants of square matrices, vectors in 2- and 3-dimensional space, norm, dot product, cross product, lines, planes, Euclidean vector spaces, linear mappings between Euclidean spaces, properties of linear mappings, general vector spaces, subspaces, linear independency, base and dimension, row, column and null spaces, rank and nullity, inner product, angle, orthogonality, Gramm-Schmidt process, change of basis, orthogonal matrices, eigenvalues, eigenvectors, linear transformations, Kernel, range, isomorphism and inverse linear transformations.

Prerequisite: MATH 151

MATH 260 - Probability and Statistics

Lecture:
4
Laboratory:
0
Total:
4

This course is an introduction to probability, operations on sets, counting problems, definition of probability, conditional probability, Bayes' theorem, one- and two-dimensional random variables, mathematical expectation and variance, basic discrete and continuous probability distributions, moment generating functions, law of large numbers, and limit theorem. Prerequisite: MATH 151

Major Upper Level Requirements (36 credits)

CMPE 361 - Windows Programming

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course focuses on graphical user interface programming, including dialog boxes, menus, toolbars, status bars, fonts, icons and bitmaps. Content also involves event-driven programming, processes, event message processing, timers, on-idle processing, multithreaded programming and C++ Windows-class libraries, such as integrated development environments, application framework and document view architecture. Prerequisites: CMPE 160 and CMPE 271

CMPE 375 - Embedded Systems Programming

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course focuses on embedded system architecture. Topics include IO programming using parallel ports, serial ports, timers, and D/A and A/D converters, as well as interrupts and real-time programming, program development and debugging tools and C language and assembler. Prerequisites: CMPE 271

CMPE 460 - Software Design and Engineering

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
1
Total:
4

This course puts emphasis on object-oriented software development, classes, inheritance, design by abstraction, design patterns, object-oriented application framework and introduction to concurrent and distributed computing.

Prerequisites: CMPE 160 and CMPE 361

CMPE 470 - Digital Circuits

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course focuses on the design of digital electronic systems using commercially available high-speed digital devices and circuits. Topics include: Hardware Description Languages (HDL) Models of Combinational Circuits, Synthesizable HDL Models of Sequential Circuits, HDL Models of Arithmetic Units, Memory and Programmable Logic.

Prerequisite: CMPE 270

CMPE 470L - Digital Logic Laboratory

Lecture:
0
Laboratory:
1
Total:
1

This course is a hands-on experience in characterization and application of standard digital integrated circuit devices. Students will learn how to design and Implement: Combinational Circuits Using VHD, Sequential Circuits, an Arithmetic and Logic Unit, in addition to measure digital circuits using digital instrumentation.

Co-requisite: CMPE 470 and Prerequisite: ELEC 330L

CMPE 475 - Microprocessors

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course emphasizes on business design, memory design, interrupt structure and input/output for microprocessor-based systems. Topics include memory map and addresses, low-level/assembly language programming, bus architecture, input/output systems, interrupts, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to interpret, analyze, verify, and troubleshoot fundamental microprocessor circuits and programs using appropriate techniques and test equipment.

Prerequisites: CMPE 375 and CMPE 470

ELEC 310 - Circuit Analysis II

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course focuses on transient and frequency response of RLC circuits, mutual inductance, network analysis using Laplace transformations, network functions, stability, convolution integrals, Bode diagrams, two-port networks, and computer analysis of circuits. The course requires filing an approved master plan with the department chair. Prerequisites: ELEC 210 and MATH 252

ELEC 330 - Fundamentals of Engineering Electronics

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

The course is the application of diodes, JFETs, MOSFETs, and BJTs in typical electronic circuits. Content also includes analysis and design of rectifiers, filters, and simple amplifiers using transistors and operational amplifiers. Prerequisite: ELEC 210

ELEC 330L - Engineering Electronics Laboratory

Lecture:
0
Laboratory:
1
Total:
1

This is a laboratory course that involves the experimental study of laboratory instruments, diodes, rectifier circuits, filters, transistors, RC lead-lag networks, series resonance, transformers, and operational amplifiers. This lab course also introduces circuit simulation techniques using various electrical design simulator tools.

Corequisite: ELEC 330

CMPE 495A - Engineering Design: Capstone Project I

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course is provided along with CMPE 495B in sequence. Both courses involve the application of industrial engineering principles and design techniques to the design, build, and testing of an engineering system. Issues related to ethics and engineering practice are also discussed. A single project is completed in this two-course sequence and is judged completed upon presentation of an oral and a written report.

Prerequisite: CMPE 460, CMPE 470L, and CMPE 475

CMPE 495B - Engineering Design: Capstone Project II

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course is provided along with CMPE 495A in sequence. Both courses involve the application of industrial engineering principles and design techniques to the design, build, and testing of an engineering system. Issues related to ethics and engineering practice are also discussed. A single project is completed in this two-course sequence and is judged completed upon presentation of an oral and a written report.

Prerequisite: CMPE 495A 

CMPE 405 - Internship

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

To qualify for the Bachelor of Science in Computer Engineering, a student must fulfill the internship requirements prior to graduation. The purpose of the internship is to expose students to the profession and give them an opportunity to apply their academic knowledge in a practical setting. 

Professional Elective Options (12 credits)

Students pursuing the Bachelor of Science in Computer Engineering must complete a minimum of 12 elective credits per the following:

  • One approved elective course in mathematics (3 credits)
  • Three engineering elective courses (9 credits):