Skip to main content

Why Industrial Engineering?

Amazon, FedEx, Disney, Mercedes-Benz, and Tesla - just a few major economic giants who have recently advertised for Industrial Engineers. This internationally mobile and varied career can be applied in leadership roles across a multitude of sectors, be it manufacturing or professional, technical, and scientific services - and the industry is growing year on year. Aerospace, architecture, automotive, machinery, artificial intelligence, healthcare – the sky is the limit with this practical and multi-faceted degree choice.

Who Should Apply?                         

This four-year undergraduate program produces versatile Industrial Engineers who can integrate science, engineering and socio-economic knowledge, and can go on to lead within the sector. If you have good interpersonal skills alongside a strong interest in mechanics, Industrial Engineering will bring out the inventor and innovator inside you. If you also have a strong basis in mathematics and science, plus a streak of creativity, then Industrial Engineering is the right program for you.

Program Content

The core IE curriculum is built on a broad foundation of math and science modules, combined with computer science, mechanics, and engineering design. Advancing to incorporate electrical engineering, tech entrepreneurship, machine learning and the science of materials - with an emphasis on operational application throughout – Industrial Engineering combines technical and management skills, encouraging analytical thinking and problem solving. This flexible degree program also delves into a range of systems and technologies with applications in energy production, robotics, environmental systems, materials, composites, transportation, manufacturing, machine design and many more.

With electives offered across business and professional services as well as computer science and even tourism, our Industrial Engineers are well-versed in not only the practical side of their field. They are also given the awareness of how their skills enhance companies and products, enabling them to take on leadership roles in a variety of sectors.

Program requirements

Program name Total Number of Credits
Bachelor of Science in Industrial Engineering
124
Credits

Course information

English Requirements (9 credits)

ENGL 101 - Composition I

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course is an overview of expository writing, including the development and revision of paragraphs and essays using various rhetorical strategies, as well as reading and discussion of selected essays, short stories and poems. In addition, the course introduces writing about literature, incorporation and documentation of material from primary sources.

ENGL 102 - Composition II

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course introduces the conventions of research writing and teaches the process of producing well-planned research papers using critical thinking and analytical skills in response to a variety of academic texts. The course is designed to provide guidance in all steps of the research process including choosing a topic, designing a research methodology, analyzing data, and writing up and presenting results.

Prerequisite: ENGL 101

ENGL 205 - Business English

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course emphasizes on techniques for communicating successfully through sound, honest written and oral business messages. The content is directed primarily to careers that involve precise writing skills, as well as general strategies involved in job related functions.

Arab Heritage Requirements (6 credits)

ARHG 101 - Arab Heritage I - Language

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course aims at developing the language skills of native speakers of Arabic, by providing the students with a comprehensive knowledge of the linguistic system. It is intended to help students attain proficiency by expanding vocabulary and providing paragraph-level activities in reading, writing, and speaking; through a selection texts by writers from across the Arab world.

ARHG 102 - Arab Heritage II - Modern History of Bahrain

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course introduces the spatial character and history of Bahrain, including the ancient and Islamic eras, and Arabic and Islamic dimensions of the identity of Bahrain  until the modern state and the development of the constitutional life in Bahrain, it also presents the philosophy of citizenship and the fundamental values of Bahrain’s society and citizenship rights ,duties and responsibilities.

Mathematics Requirements (6 credits)

MATH 151 - Calculus I

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course introduces functions limits and continuity, derivatives of functions of one variable, application of the derivative, related rates, maximum and minimum values, the mean value theorem, the integral and indefinite integrals and integration rules, inverse functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, inverse trigonometric functions, hyperbolic functions, and L’Hospital’s rule. 

MATH 152 - Calculus II

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course involves the applications and techniques of integration, including integration by substitution, integration by parts and integration by partial fractions, application of integration, parametric equations and polar coordinates, convergence of sequences and series, Power Series and approximation using Taylor Series.

Prerequisite: MATH 151

Science Requirements (8 credits)

CHEM 101 - General Chemistry 1

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
1
Total:
4

This course introduces the general principles of chemistry with emphasis on inorganic materials.  This course will provide students with a comprehensive overview of the major areas of chemistry.  The topics covered range from the atomic theory to the descriptions of chemical reactivity and reactions, quantitative methods in chemistry, reactions in aqueous media and chemical bonding. Prerequisites: High school chemistry and 2 years of high school algebra.

PHYS 101 - Principles of Physics

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course will provide students with a comprehensive overview of the some of the major areas of physics. Topics covered range from measurements and error analysis of physical dimensions to understand the concepts of motions and forces in one, two and three dimensions, free fall acceleration, kinetic, potential and conservation of energy.

Prerequisites: MATH 151

Social Science Requirements (9 credits)

ARHG 103 - Global Human Rights

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course introduces the basic principles and the definition of human rights with an emphasis on the International Convention of human rights. It aims to reflect current developments and questions arising in international human rights law, to communicate debates and arguments concerning human rights, and to analyze the application of international human rights principles in the context of Bahrain.

PSYC 100 - Introduction to Psychology

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

Psychology is a field focused on scientifically understanding how humans think, feel, and act. This course will introduce you to the basic concepts and research within the field of psychology and hopefully it will allow you to gain a better understanding of the self and others. The course will cover a wide range of topics such as research methodology, biological bases of behavior, perception, motivation and emotion, learning and memory, development, intelligence, personality and social influence.

SOSC 100 - Introduction to Sociology

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course provides a broad overview of sociology and how it applies to everyday life. Major theoretical perspectives and concepts are presented, including sociological imagination, culture, deviance, inequality, social change, and social structure. Students also explore the influence of social class and social institutions, such as churches, education, healthcare, government, economy, and environment. The family as a social structure is also examined.

Core Requirements (17 credits)

CIVL 200 - Engineering Mechanics – Statics

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course is an introduction to the concept of modeling and basic principles of rigid bodies, equivalent systems of forces, equilibrium of rigid bodies, analysis of planar rigid body systems, distributed forces, normal and shear forces and moment diagrams, and virtual work principle. Prerequisite: PHYS 101

CMPE 160 - Introduction to Computer Programming and Applications

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course introduces computer organization and operation. Topics include binary representation of information, fundamentals of computer programming using a C family language, data types, selection and iteration structures, functions, arrays, pointers, scope and duration of variables and the systematic design and development of computer programs.

ENGR 201 - Methods of Analysis

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course involves selected analytical and numerical methods for solving problems from various engineering fields: Solution of initial and boundary value problems, series solutions, Laplace transforms, and nonlinear equations; numerical methods for solving ordinary differential equations, accuracy of numerical methods, linear stability theory, and finite differences. This course also introduces a programming basic tool for computation problems with engineering applications.

Prerequisite: MATH 151

MATH 252 - Calculus III

Lecture:
4
Laboratory:
0
Total:
4

This course emphasizes on vector functions (continuity, derivatives, and integrals), parametric curves and surfaces, polar coordinates, as well as functions of several variables (including continuity and partial derivatives, gradient, directional derivatives). Topics also include the chain rule, double and triple integrals, iterated integrals, integration using polar, cylindrical, and spherical coordinates, change of variables, line and surface integrals (including surface area), curl and divergence, and the integral theorems of Green, Stokes, and Gauss. Prerequisites: MATH 151 and MATH 152

PHYS 102 - Principles of Physics II

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

The course provides an overview of the fundamental principles of physics in areas of electricity and magnetism. Topics include electric field, Gauss law, electric potential, capacitance and dielectrics, current and resistance, direct current circuits, magnetic fields, sources of magnetic fields, Faraday’s law, inductance, alternating current circuits, and electromagnetic waves. The course is designed for students requiring calculus-based physics. Prerequisites: MATH 152 and PHYS 101

Major Lower Level Requirements (16 credits)

ELEC 204 - Principles of Electrical Engineering

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course focuses on circuit analysis, phasor diagrams, single-phase and three-phase power, semiconductor devices and applications, and energy conversion devices. (This course is not open to electrical or computer engineering majors.)

Prerequisites: MATH 152 and PHYS 102

MATH 260 - Probability and Statistics

Lecture:
4
Laboratory:
0
Total:
4

This course is an introduction to probability, operations on sets, counting problems, definition of probability, conditional probability, Bayes' theorem, one- and two-dimensional random variables, mathematical expectation and variance, basic discrete and continuous probability distributions, moment generating functions, law of large numbers, and limit theorem. Prerequisite: MATH 151

MECH 101 - Solid Modeling I

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course focuses on computer-aided solid modeling, including engineering documentation, dimensioning and tolerancing per ASME Y14.5M-1004. Elementary sketching and dimensioning of orthographic and pictorial drawings and sections are also discussed.

MECH 210 - Materials Science

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course focuses on materials and properties. Topics also include atomic bonding and arrangements, structural imperfections, atom movements, deformation of materials, physical properties, industrial alloys, modification of properties of materials through changes in structure, and nonmetallic materials. (This course is for non-mechanical engineering students.)

Prerequisite: CHEM 101

NDSE 120 - Introduction to Industrial Engineering

Lecture:
1
Laboratory:
0
Total:
1

This course is an introduction and orientation to industrial engineering. Topics surveyed include concepts and approaches, illustrations of main methods and applications presented by a series of lectures given by the NDSE faculty. The course also involves an overview of departmental laboratories, basic information technologies, and software including mathematical packages and Web-based applications.

NDSE 202 - Operations Research I: Linear Models

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course focuses on modeling concepts, linear programming, problem formulation, simplex and dual-simplex methods, duality and sensitivity analysis, transportation, transshipment and assignment problems, integer programming, cutting plane algorithms, and branch and bound techniques.

Major Upper Level Requirements (44 credits)

CMPE 390 - Introduction to Machine Learning and Data Analytics

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This data science course is an introduction to machine learning and algorithms. You will develop a basic understanding of the principles of machine learning and derive practical solutions using predictive analytics. We will also examine why algorithms play an essential role in Big Data analysis.

Prerequisites: MATH 260

ECON 341 - Engineering Economic Analysis

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course provides an overview of the foundations of engineering economy, effects of time and interest rates on money, nominal and effective interest rates, present worth analysis, annual worth analysis, rate of return analysis, benefit/cost analysis, replacement and retention decisions, selection from independent projects under budget limitation and breakeven analysis. Prerequisite: MATH 152

MGMT 404 - Technology Entrepreneurship

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course focuses on the creation of investable technology-based start-ups. Topics include identifying and evaluating opportunities, human capital, key operations, lean start-up methodology, pitch deck and elevator pitch, start-up funding rounds (FFF, business angels, venture capitals, media for equity). Different actual businesses are studied through case-study analysis.

NDSE 303 - Operations Research II: Nonlinear Models

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course focuses on nonlinear programming, optimization in one variable, convexity, unconstrained and constrained optimization in many variables, Kuhn-Tucker optimality conditions, direct search and gradient methods, computational complexity, and major heuristic approaches, such as simulated annealing, neural networks, tabu search, and genetic algorithms. Prerequisite: NDSE 202

NDSE 304 - Operations Research III: Stochastic Models

Lecture:
4
Laboratory:
0
Total:
4

This course emphasizes on decision making under uncertainty and is an introduction to stochastic processes. Topics also include Markov chains, probabilistic dynamic programming, Markov decision processes, stochastic inventory theory, Poisson processes, and queuing and reliability models.

Prerequisite: NDSE 303

NDSE 306 - Systems Simulation

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course introduces basic concepts of discrete-event simulation modeling and analysis. Topics include event-scheduling versus process-interaction approach, as well as random number and random variate generation, inverse transformation and other selected techniques, input data analysis and goodness-of-fit tests, specific computer simulation languages, and analysis of simulation output and model validation. Prerequisite: MATH 260

NDSE 312 - Facilities Design and Planning

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course focuses on the nature and classification of production systems. Topics include product design; forecasting methods, such as simple linear regression, moving average and exponential smoothing methods; capacity requirements planning; design of discrete production systems, such as product-based layout and assembly line balancing; process-based layout and design of work stations; group technology and cell design; material handling and storage systems; and facility location, including discrete and continuous space location models.

NDSE 381 - Safety Engineering

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course focuses on human protection systems, emergency and accident handling, hazard identification techniques, safety vs reliability and systems safety quantification. The course relies no the applications of engineering design solutions that meet specified requirements with consideration of public health, safety, among other ethical and environmental requirements. It also develops an engineering approach to analysis, investigation of occupational accidents, and prepare prevention solutions.

NDSE 413 - Supply Chain Management

Lecture:
4
Laboratory:
0
Total:
4

This course provides an overview of the fundamentals of supply chain management and enterprise resources planning (ERP). Topics also include aggregate production planning (static, dynamic, nonlinear, and lot sizing models), operations scheduling (flow shops and job shops), materials management and materials requirement planning (MRP), capacity resources planning (CRP), distribution system management, and implementation of manufacturing management strategies.

Prerequisite: NDSE 312

NDSE 423 - Quality Engineering

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course provides an overview of the principles of quality control systems, process control concepts, specification and tolerances, process capability studies, control charts, acceptance sampling plans, cost aspects of quality decisions, quality improvement programs, and quality information systems. Prerequisite: MATH 260

NDSE 495A - Engineering Design: Capstone Project I

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

Capstone Projects I and II each have 3 credits. These courses involve the application of industrial engineering principles and design techniques to the design, build, and testing of an engineering system. Issues related to ethics and engineering practice are also discussed. A single project is completed in this two-course sequence and is judged completed upon presentation of an oral and a written report.

NSDE 495B - Engineering Design: Capstone Project II

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

These courses involve the application of industrial engineering principles and design techniques to the design, build, and testing of an engineering system. Issues related to ethics and engineering practice are also discussed. A single project is completed in this two-course sequence and is judged completed upon presentation of an oral and a written report. Prerequisite for NDSE 495B: NDSE 495A

NDSE 405 - Industrial Engineering Internship

Lecture:
6
Laboratory:
0
Total:
6

To qualify for the Bachelor of Science in Industrial Engineering, a student must fulfill the internship requirements prior to graduation. The purpose of the internship is to expose students to the profession and give them an opportunity to apply their academic knowledge in a practical setting. The internship consists of a minimum of 240 work hours (6 weeks) for third-year students and 320 work hours (8 weeks) for fourth-year students with an approved employer. Internships are evaluated by the internship coordinator with a pass/fail grade.

Professional Elective Options (9 Credits)

Students pursuing the Bachelor of Science in Industrial Engineering must complete a minimum of minimum of 9 elective credits in industrial engineering (NDSE) coursework offered at or above the 400 level or approved courses from other departments (choose 3 courses).