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Why Civil Engineering?

Have you ever looked at an enormous skyscraper and wondered how it got there? The answer will always lead directly to Civil Engineers. Civil Engineering provides the backbone for all large-scale public works projects and private developments. Iconic buildings all over the world, from the Burj Khalifa to the San Francisco bridge were conceived and constructed by civil engineers who have become celebrities in their fields. Our AUBH degree program will give students the competitive edge they need to be a mega-project designer, while also preparing them for the technical and social requirements of working within the development industry.

Who Should Apply?

Anyone who likes to think big! A Civil Engineering qualification will bring graduates to project possibilities all around the world. Whether at home or abroad, civil engineers are always in demand, designing and implementing large-scale construction projects and architectural icons. This four-year Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering combines technical and management skills, making graduates the most flexible and versatile engineers. The College focuses on the integration of strong mathematics, sciences and computing preparation with a wide range of business applications, and the development of ethical, socially responsible and global attitudes.

Program Content

Built on a solid foundation of Mathematics, Chemistry and Physics, the Bachelor’s of Civil Engineering degree also addresses the social implications of large-scale projects through coursework in social sciences. After completing the core requirements, students can hone their passion through elective courses that focus on their specific interests, such as Open Channel Hydraulics and Masonry Structure Design. An internship completes this multi-layered degree by giving students important hands-on practical instruction. Our students don’t just read about what it is like to be a Civil Engineer, they spend time in the field learning what day to day work requires.

This degree program is planned to be offered in the 2021-2022 academic year, subject to HEC approval.*

Program requirements

Program name Total Number of Credits
Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering*
130
Credits

Course information

English Requirements (9 credits)

ENGL 101 - Composition I

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course is an overview of expository writing, including the development and revision of paragraphs and essays using various rhetorical strategies, as well as reading and discussion of selected essays, short stories and poems. In addition, the course introduces writing about literature, incorporation and documentation of material from primary sources.

ENGL 102 - Composition II

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course introduces the conventions of research writing and teaches the process of producing well-planned research papers using critical thinking and analytical skills in response to a variety of academic texts. The course is designed to provide guidance in all steps of the research process including choosing a topic, designing a research methodology, analyzing data, and writing up and presenting results.

Prerequisite: ENGL 101

ENGL 205 - Business English

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course emphasizes on techniques for communicating successfully through sound, honest written and oral business messages. The content is directed primarily to careers that involve precise writing skills, as well as general strategies involved in job related functions.

Arab Heritage Requirements (6 credits)

ARHG 101 - Arab Heritage I - Language

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course aims at developing the language skills of native speakers of Arabic, by providing the students with a comprehensive knowledge of the linguistic system. It is intended to help students attain proficiency by expanding vocabulary and providing paragraph-level activities in reading, writing, and speaking; through a selection texts by writers from across the Arab world.

ARHG 102 - Arab Heritage II - Modern History of Bahrain

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course introduces the spatial character and history of Bahrain, including the ancient and Islamic eras, and Arabic and Islamic dimensions of the identity of Bahrain  until the modern state and the development of the constitutional life in Bahrain, it also presents the philosophy of citizenship and the fundamental values of Bahrain’s society and citizenship rights ,duties and responsibilities.

Mathematics Requirements (6 credits)

MATH 151 - Calculus I

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course introduces functions limits and continuity, derivatives of functions of one variable, application of the derivative, related rates, maximum and minimum values, the mean value theorem, the integral and indefinite integrals and integration rules, inverse functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, inverse trigonometric functions, hyperbolic functions, and L’Hospital’s rule. 

MATH 152 - Calculus II

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course involves the applications and techniques of integration, including integration by substitution, integration by parts and integration by partial fractions, application of integration, parametric equations and polar coordinates, convergence of sequences and series, Power Series and approximation using Taylor Series.

Prerequisite: MATH 151

Science Requirements (8 credits)

CHEM 101 - General Chemistry 1

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
1
Total:
4

This course introduces the general principles of chemistry with emphasis on inorganic materials.  This course will provide students with a comprehensive overview of the major areas of chemistry.  The topics covered range from the atomic theory to the descriptions of chemical reactivity and reactions, quantitative methods in chemistry, reactions in aqueous media and chemical bonding. Prerequisites: High school chemistry and 2 years of high school algebra.

PHYS 101 - Principles of Physics

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course will provide students with a comprehensive overview of the some of the major areas of physics. Topics covered range from measurements and error analysis of physical dimensions to understand the concepts of motions and forces in one, two and three dimensions, free fall acceleration, kinetic, potential and conservation of energy.

Prerequisites: MATH 151

CHEM 201L - General Chemistry I Laboratory

Lecture:
1
Laboratory:
1
Total:
2

This course introduces students to laboratory and measurement techniques commonly used in chemistry laboratories. Techniques include mass and volume measurements, qualitative and quantitative analysis, volumetric analysis, thermochemistry, inorganic synthesis and spectrophotometric analysis.

Prerequisites: High school chemistry and 2 years of high school algebra

Social Science Requirements (9 credits)

ARHG 103 - Global Human Rights

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course introduces the basic principles and the definition of human rights with an emphasis on the International Convention of human rights. It aims to reflect current developments and questions arising in international human rights law, to communicate debates and arguments concerning human rights, and to analyze the application of international human rights principles in the context of Bahrain.

PSYC 100 - Introduction to Psychology

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

Psychology is a field focused on scientifically understanding how humans think, feel, and act. This course will introduce you to the basic concepts and research within the field of psychology and hopefully it will allow you to gain a better understanding of the self and others. The course will cover a wide range of topics such as research methodology, biological bases of behavior, perception, motivation and emotion, learning and memory, development, intelligence, personality and social influence.

SOSC 100 - Introduction to Sociology

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course provides a broad overview of sociology and how it applies to everyday life. Major theoretical perspectives and concepts are presented, including sociological imagination, culture, deviance, inequality, social change, and social structure. Students also explore the influence of social class and social institutions, such as churches, education, healthcare, government, economy, and environment. The family as a social structure is also examined.

Core Requirements (17 credits)

CIVL 200 - Engineering Mechanics – Statics

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course is an introduction to the concept of modeling and basic principles of rigid bodies, equivalent systems of forces, equilibrium of rigid bodies, analysis of planar rigid body systems, distributed forces, normal and shear forces and moment diagrams, and virtual work principle. Prerequisite: PHYS 101

CMPE 160 - Introduction to Computer Programming and Applications

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course introduces computer organization and operation. Topics include binary representation of information, fundamentals of computer programming using a C family language, data types, selection and iteration structures, functions, arrays, pointers, scope and duration of variables and the systematic design and development of computer programs.

ENGR 201 - Methods of Analysis

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course involves selected analytical and numerical methods for solving problems from various engineering fields: Solution of initial and boundary value problems, series solutions, Laplace transforms, and nonlinear equations; numerical methods for solving ordinary differential equations, accuracy of numerical methods, linear stability theory, and finite differences. This course also introduces a programming basic tool for computation problems with engineering applications.

Prerequisite: MATH 151

MATH 252 - Calculus III

Lecture:
4
Laboratory:
0
Total:
4

This course emphasizes on vector functions (continuity, derivatives, and integrals), parametric curves and surfaces, polar coordinates, as well as functions of several variables (including continuity and partial derivatives, gradient, directional derivatives). Topics also include the chain rule, double and triple integrals, iterated integrals, integration using polar, cylindrical, and spherical coordinates, change of variables, line and surface integrals (including surface area), curl and divergence, and the integral theorems of Green, Stokes, and Gauss. Prerequisites: MATH 151 and MATH 152

PHYS 102 - Principles of Physics II

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

The course provides an overview of the fundamental principles of physics in areas of electricity and magnetism. Topics include electric field, Gauss law, electric potential, capacitance and dielectrics, current and resistance, direct current circuits, magnetic fields, sources of magnetic fields, Faraday’s law, inductance, alternating current circuits, and electromagnetic waves. The course is designed for students requiring calculus-based physics. Prerequisites: MATH 152 and PHYS 101

PHYS 102L - Principles of Physics II Laboratory

Lecture:
0
Laboratory:
1
Total:
1

This course involves experiments in DC circuits, AC circuits, electrical resonance, oscilloscope measurement techniques, and electric and magnetic fields. Prerequisite/concurrent: PHYS 102

Major Requirements (68 credits)

ECON 341 - Engineering Economic Analysis

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course provides an overview of the foundations of engineering economy, effects of time and interest rates on money, nominal and effective interest rates, present worth analysis, annual worth analysis, rate of return analysis, benefit/cost analysis, replacement and retention decisions, selection from independent projects under budget limitation and breakeven analysis. Prerequisite: MATH 152

ELEC 204 - Principles of Electrical Engineering

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course focuses on circuit analysis, phasor diagrams, single-phase and three-phase power, semiconductor devices and applications, and energy conversion devices. (This course is not open to electrical or computer engineering majors.)

Prerequisites: MATH 152 and PHYS 102

MECH 240 - Introduction to Engineering Materials

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course focuses on the atomic and molecular structure of materials utilized in engineering. The content also analyzes the relationships between structure of materials and mechanical, thermal, electrical, corrosion and radiation properties. Applications of material structure relevant to civil, electrical, aerospace, and mechanical engineering are also introduced.

Prerequisite: CHEM 101; Concurrent: CIVL 200

MECH 240L - Materials Laboratory

Lecture:
0
Laboratory:
1
Total:
1

This course introduces students to experimental methods used to characterize engineering materials and mechanical behavior.

Concurrent: MECH 240

CIVL 301 - Introduction to Solid Mechanics

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course introduces students to the mechanics of solid deformable bodies. It presents various analytical methods for determining strength, stiffness and stability of load-carrying members.

Prerequisite: CIVL 200

MECH 360 - Fluid Mechanics

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course provides an overview of dimensional analysis with applications. Topics covered also include fluid statics and applications, integral and differential mass, energy and momentum balances, laminar and turbulent flow of Newtonian fluids, as well as flow measurements.

Prerequisite: PHYS 102

MECH 360L - Fluid Mechanics Laboratory

Lecture:
1
Laboratory:
0
Total:
1

This course introduces students to the experimental methods used to characterize fluid mechanics and behavior.

Prerequisite/concurrent: MECH 360

CIVL 100 - Introduction to Civil Engineering

Lecture:
1
Laboratory:
0
Total:
1

This course is an introduction to the diverse field of civil and environmental engineering. The topics covered include structural, geotechnical, water resources, transportation, construction engineering and management and environmental engineering. Legal, ethical and international dimensions of the profession are also discussed. (Prerequisite: None) 

CIVL 120 - Digital Applications in Civil Engineering

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course is the application of computing tools for Civil Engineering. Content also focuses on the use of spreadsheets, programming, mathematical analysis programs, presentation and graphics programs. (Prerequisite/concurrent: MATH 152) 

CIVL 160 - Statistical Methods for the Built Environment

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course consists of the application of statistical methods to civil and environmental engineering problems in construction, hydrology, water quality, air pollution, and other related areas.

CIVL 218 - Surveying for Civil Engineering and Construction

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course is an introduction to the principles of plane surveying. Topics include measurement of horizontal distance, difference in elevation and angles; traverse surveys and computations; horizontal and vertical curves; principles of stadia; topographic surveys; and earthwork. (Prerequisites: CIVL 160 and MATH 152) 

CIVL 321 - Structural Analysis I

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course is an analysis of beams, frames, trusses and three-dimensional frameworks. Topics also include influence lines, deflections, introduction to statically indeterminate structures and moment distribution. Prerequisites: CIVL 301 and CIVL 301L

CIVL 401 - Civil Engineering and Society

Lecture:
1
Laboratory:
0
Total:
1

This course explores the role of civil engineering in society and explores historical, political, esthetic and philosophical perspectives on civil engineering. Contemporary issues involving civil engineering are also presented and discussed. (Prerequisite: Senior standing in civil engineering). 

CIVL 444 - Applied Hydraulics

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course presents the basic laws of fluid mechanics to hydraulic problems by focusing on open channel and pressure conduit flow, pumps and turbines, hydroelectric power, flood control and water law.

CIVL 462 - Geotechnical Engineering

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course focuses on the mechanics of soil as applicable to engineering problems, soil classification, compaction, swelling, consolidation, strength and permeability. Applications to geotechnical and environmental engineering problems are also discussed. (Prerequisite: CIVL 301 or MECH 360) 

CIVL 462L - Geotechnical Engineering Laboratory

Lecture:
0
Laboratory:
1
Total:
1

This course is a laboratory experience that focuses on procedures of soil testing for geotechnical and environmental engineering problems. (Prerequisite/concurrent: CIVL 462) 

CIVL 481 - Transportation Engineering

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course focuses on the physical design of transportation facilities, traffic analysis and control for different modes, planning and demand analysis, environmental impacts of transportation systems and intelligent transportation systems.

CIVL 495A - Civil Engineering Design: Capstone Project I

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

These courses involve the application of engineering principles and design techniques for the planning and designing of civil engineering projects. (Prerequisites/concurrent for CIVL 495A: CIVL 321, CIVL 444, CIVL 462, and CIVL 481 (at least three of these courses must be completed prior to enrolling); Prerequisite/concurrent for CIVL 495A: CONS 480; Prerequisite for CIVL 495B: CIVL 495A) 

CIVL 495b - Civil Engineering Design: Capstone Project II

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

These courses involve the application of engineering principles and design techniques for the planning and designing of civil engineering projects. (Prerequisites/concurrent for CIVL 495A: CIVL 321, CIVL 444, CIVL 462, and CIVL 481 (at least three of these courses must be completed prior to enrolling); Prerequisite/concurrent for CIVL 495A: CONS 480; Prerequisite for CIVL 495B: CIVL 495A) 

CIVL 405 - Civil Engineering Internship

Lecture:
6
Laboratory:
0
Total:
6

This course provides students with the opportunity to practice on the job at an accounting department of a business organization or at an audit firm for a period of six to seven weeks, thereby transferring and developing industry-specific, civil engineering, construction and other skills acquired from prior study. (Prerequisite: Junior standing)

Major Electives (9 credits)

CIVL 421 - Reinforced Concrete Design

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course explores the properties and characteristics of reinforced concrete, the design of structural components, plastic theory and limit design. (Prerequisite: CIVL 321)

CIVL 445 - Applied Hydrology

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course focuses on basic hydrologic principles, hydrologic measurements, small and midsize catchment hydrology, frequency analysis, regional analysis, reservoir, stream channel and catchment routing, and hydrologic design. (Prerequisite: CIVL 444) 

CIVL 482 - Highway Engineering

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course focuses on highway design, facility sizing, geometric design, drainage, earthwork, pavement design, traffic control devices, safety and environmental considerations. (Prerequisite: CIVL 481)

CIVL 491 - Construction Methods

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course focuses on the components and methods of construction, including earthwork, foundations, wood, steel and concrete construction, roofing and cladding as well as interior construction. (Prerequisite: CIVL 321) 

CIVL 492 - Construction Engineering

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

The specific course is project-oriented with a focus on cost estimation, alternative cost-saving changes and critical path scheduling. (Prerequisites: CIVL 491 and CONS 430)

CIVL 521 - Structural Analysis II

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course explores statically indeterminate structures by virtual work. Topics also include advanced treatment of slope deflection, moment distribution, arch analysis, secondary stresses in trusses, advanced treatment of influence lines, and matrix analysis of structures. (Prerequisite: CIVL 321) 

CIVL 525 - Design of Steel Structures

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course focuses on the mechanical behavior of structural steel, the design of steel beams, girders, columns and members subjected to combined stresses; as well as the design of various types of connections of steel structures, plate girders, continuous beams, and rigid frames. (Prerequisite: CIVL 321) 

CIVL 528 - Masonry Structures Design

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course focuses on the analysis and design of masonry beams, retaining walls, shear walls, bearing walls and columns. Topics also include use of allowable stress and strength design methods, structural system analysis and lateral design of masonry buildings. (Prerequisites: CIVL 301 and CIVL 321) 

CIVL 530 - Open Channel Hydraulics

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course focuses on the principles of open channel flow, computer simulations and applications, design and environmental problems, culvert hydraulics, as well as on the analysis of critical, uniform, gradually-varied and rapidly-varied flows. (Prerequisite: CIVL 444) 

CIVL 580 - Traffic Engineering Design

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course focuses on sizing and configuration of highway facilities based on capacity analysis. Topics covered also include traffic signal design, impact and mitigation studies, parking and safety design. (Prerequisite: CIVL 481) 

Professional Electives

Students pursuing the Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering must complete a minimum of 12 elective credits from six specialization options with a maximum of not more than six credits from any one specialization.