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Why Human Resources?

A company’s human resources department does much more than hire staff; They are at the forefront of creating fair labor practices, ensuring diversity in the workplace and helping employees get the best out of their roles. Professionals in Human Resources work to create a safe, healthy, productive environment to support and grow a business. Human Resource professionals often sit at the right hand of CEOs, helping them to nurture talent, listening to business needs and ultimately growing company productivity.

Who Should Apply

Active listeners who can think globally, and ethical and fair professionals who can balance company and employee welfare. Students who are good communicators and have the ability to inspire others will have an immediate advantage in this program. Graduates will not only be full-discipline HR professionals with this degree; specific area roles will be open to them, for example Compensation and Benefits, Employee Relations, Recruiter / Talent or Training and Professional Development.

Program Content

With a focus on soft skills, this four-year program sees students develop an appreciation of the impact of internal and external issues facing their company’s employees, the strategic nature of human resource management interventions, empathy, and active listening and communication skills. Modules also cover global thinking, the challenges of working in a changing environment and the key behaviors of a HR professional practitioner. Students than have the options to hone their studies, concentrating on areas that are meaningful to them, like Organizational Behavior or Financial Risk Management. By the time students finish at AUBH, they are equipped as 360-degree Human Resource professionals in any chosen industry.

 

This degree program is planned to be offered in the 2021-2022 academic year, subject to HEC approval.*

Program requirements

Program name Total Number of Credits
Bachelor of Business Administration in Human Resource Management*
125
Credits

Course information

English Requirements (9 credits)

ENGL 101 - Composition I

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course is an overview of expository writing, including the development and revision of paragraphs and essays using various rhetorical strategies, as well as reading and discussion of selected essays, short stories and poems. In addition, the course introduces writing about literature, incorporation and documentation of material from primary sources.

ENGL 102 - Composition II

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course introduces the conventions of research writing and teaches the process of producing well-planned research papers using critical thinking and analytical skills in response to a variety of academic texts. The course is designed to provide guidance in all steps of the research process including choosing a topic, designing a research methodology, analyzing data, and writing up and presenting results.

Prerequisite: ENGL 101

ENGL 205 - Business English

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course emphasizes on techniques for communicating successfully through sound, honest written and oral business messages. The content is directed primarily to careers that involve precise writing skills, as well as general strategies involved in job related functions.

Arab Heritage Requirements (6 credits)

ARHG 101 - Arab Heritage I - Language

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course aims at developing the language skills of native speakers of Arabic, by providing the students with a comprehensive knowledge of the linguistic system. It is intended to help students attain proficiency by expanding vocabulary and providing paragraph-level activities in reading, writing, and speaking; through a selection texts by writers from across the Arab world.

ARHG 102 - Arab Heritage II - Modern History of Bahrain

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course introduces the spatial character and history of Bahrain, including the ancient and Islamic eras, and Arabic and Islamic dimensions of the identity of Bahrain  until the modern state and the development of the constitutional life in Bahrain, it also presents the philosophy of citizenship and the fundamental values of Bahrain’s society and citizenship rights ,duties and responsibilities.

Mathematics Requirements (6 credits) - Choose two courses

MATH 115 - Business Statistics

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course introduces the concepts of and need for statistics, collection, tabulations, graphical representation of statistical data, frequency distributions, measures of central tendency, measures of dispersion and skewness, probability and probability distributions, the binomial, the Poisson and the normal distributions, sampling, and estimating means and percentages.

Choose one from the following

MATH 130 - College Algebra

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course introduces sets, number systems, fractions, polynomials, linear equations in one variable, functions, special functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, equation of a straight line, systems of equations and mathematics of finance.

MATH 131 - Finite Math with Calculus

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course introduces matrix algebra, inequalities and systems of linear inequalities, linear programming, and basics of differential and integral calculus.

Prerequisite: MATH 130

Science Requirements (8 credits) - Choose two courses

BIOL 101 - Principles of Biology

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
1
Total:
4

The basis of study in a variety of fields builds upon the capacity to view the world from multiple perspectives as well as the ability to ask investigative questions on the intricacies of life. Students in this course work toward gaining such skills as they survey fundamental biological principles. Students engage in discussions, application-based assignments that emphasize basic biology, cell biology, metabolism, genetics, evolution, ecology and diversity. Students also gain an introduction to the scientific method. Through this course, students will have the opportunity to increase their fundamental understanding of biology as it applies to everyday life.

CHEM 103 - Introduction to Chemistry and Applications

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
1
Total:
4

The objective of this course is to introduce to non-science and non-engineering majors the fundamental principles of chemistry.  It will include physical and chemical properties of matter, dimensional analysis, the atomic theory, naming compounds, mass relationships in chemical reactions, calculating limiting reagents in reactions, reactions in aqueous solutions, acid-base titrations, and different types of chemical bonding in molecules.  To summarize, this course is designed to introduce introductory and basic principles of chemistry to non-science and non-engineering majors.

Social Science Requirements (9 credits)

ARHG 103 - Global Human Rights

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course introduces the basic principles and the definition of human rights with an emphasis on the International Convention of human rights. It aims to reflect current developments and questions arising in international human rights law, to communicate debates and arguments concerning human rights, and to analyze the application of international human rights principles in the context of Bahrain.

PSYC 100 - Introduction to Psychology

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

Psychology is a field focused on scientifically understanding how humans think, feel, and act. This course will introduce you to the basic concepts and research within the field of psychology and hopefully it will allow you to gain a better understanding of the self and others. The course will cover a wide range of topics such as research methodology, biological bases of behavior, perception, motivation and emotion, learning and memory, development, intelligence, personality and social influence.

SOSC 100 - Introduction to Sociology

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course provides a broad overview of sociology and how it applies to everyday life. Major theoretical perspectives and concepts are presented, including sociological imagination, culture, deviance, inequality, social change, and social structure. Students also explore the influence of social class and social institutions, such as churches, education, healthcare, government, economy, and environment. The family as a social structure is also examined.

Business Core Requirements (39 Credits)

BUSN 101 - Introduction to Business

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course introduces the fundamental principles of business organization, ownership, operation, and control.

BUSN 301 - Business Law

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course provides an understanding of legal history and legal institutions and an overview of the most important principles and rules of court procedure and evidence, as well as the general principles of contract law that are relevant for business and professional courses.

ACCT 101 - Introduction to Financial Accounting

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course introduces the field of accounting and the use of accounting information as a basis for business decisions. It provides a better understanding of the environment in which accounting information is developed and used. This course concentrates on a user-oriented approach thus enabling students to become life-long information users. Emphasis is placed on interpretation and use as opposed to the preparation of accounting information.

ACCT 102 - Introduction to Managerial Accounting

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course introduces the fundamental managerial accounting concepts and techniques which aid management in decision making, planning, controlling, and performance evaluation. Topics include cost-volume-profit (CVP) analysis, relevant costing, budgeting, and inventory planning.

Prerequisite: ACCT 101

ECON 101 - Principles of Microeconomics

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course introduces students to those principles essential to an understanding of the fundamental economic challenges and problems consumers, firms and governments face.

ECON 102 - Principles of Macroeconomics

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course introduces the principles of macroeconomics and exposes students to the theory of national income determination, economic fluctuations fiscal and monetary policy and international economics.

Prerequisite: ECON 101

FINC 101 - Essentials of Financial Analysis

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course is an introductory comprehensive analysis of the main concepts prevailing in the area of finance. The course begins with basic concepts, focusing on the economic environment (including financial markets), risk and the valuation process, and then shows how specific techniques and decision rules can be used to help maximize the value of the firm.

Prerequisites: ACCT 101, ECON 101, MATH 115, and MATH 131

MGMT 101 - Principles of Management

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course explores the basic managerial functions of planning, organizing, leading, motivating, and controlling the contemporary environment.

MGMT 205 - Organizational Behavior

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course provides an overview of the complex issues surrounding contemporary organizations in an internal environment and examines the contribution of behavioral science to the management process from a theoretical and functional perspective. This course also deals with people in business enterprise and organizational relations.

Prerequisite: MGMT 101

MGMT 350 - Business Ethics

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course introduces the ethical dimensions of business as related to the various stakeholders inside and outside the organization. Topics include business ethical theory, ethical decision making, typical dilemmas, and corporate social responsibility.

Prerequisite: MGMT 205 and ENGL 205

MGMT 401 - Business Policy and Strategic Management

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course provides a basic understanding of the strategic management and business policies in modern organizations. This course is designed to develop problem-solving and decision-making skills in business situations that involve the organization as a whole and integrate knowledge and skills acquired from all areas of business.

Prerequisites: Business senior standing, MGMT 101, MRKG 101, and FINC 201

MRKG 101 - Principles of Marketing

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course explores the marketing mix of ingredients. Emphasis is also placed on the analysis of the external factors of the business environment that influence marketing decisions.

MSYS 101 - Principles of Management Information Systems

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course provides an overview of management information systems, as well as the planning, designing, and implementation of a management information system. Course content also emphasizes application of the systems.

Major Requirements (30 Credits)

MGMT 302 - Managing Human Resources

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course examines the foundations, functions, and activities involved in the managing of human resources, striking a balance between current theory and practice. The course includes the following topics: manpower planning, recruitment and selection, policy and procedures, performance appraisal, compensation and benefits, training, safety and industrial relations. Prerequisites: MGMT 101

HRMT 302 - Recruiting the Best Talent

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

In today’s highly competitive business world, for an organization to succeed, attracting the best talent is critical. Learn how to bridge the talent gap, address global skills shortages, implement quality interviewing techniques, and identify employability best practices. Gain an awareness of a wide range of issues, principles, practices and trends in onboarding, recruiting, interviewing, assessing, and selecting the right individuals for best fit. Prerequisite(s): MGMT101, MGMT302 

HRMT 304 - Compensation, Benefits and HRIS Systems

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

Discover how compensation systems influence organizational productivity, equity, and competitiveness. Develop strategic and analytical business acumen skills by applying compensation principles to organizational objectives. Look at how corporations use HRIS systems for management, data, balance scorecard analyses, and payroll tracking to improve long-term performance. Get hands-on practice with tools and processes for developing job designs and descriptions, internal data systems, and pay surveys. Prerequisite(s): FINC101, MGMT302 
 

HRMT 401 - Labor Relations and Ethical Issues in HRM

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

Explore techniques for effectively dealing with labor relations, including team management, industrial relations, grievances, and conflict resolution. Identify legal and ethical issues surrounding the contemporary study of labor relations and learn how to analyze these considering both Bahraini and international labor laws. Topics in course include business ethics, ethical management practices, ethical decision-making, dispute resolutions, and dealing with contemporary ethical dilemmas in the workforce. Prerequisite(s): BUSN301, MGMT302, BUSN350 

HRMT 402 - Training, Coaching, and Succession Planning

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

Research shows that Training and Development increases employees’ job satisfaction and morale, which leads to more efficiency and better profits. Acquire techniques for successfully fulfilling employee training and development needs, incorporating training and learning theories. Gain an overview of the main concepts, strategies and methodologies of employee training and development. Examine the key concepts at each stage of the training process including needs analysis, delivery options and program evaluation. Prerequisite(s): MGMT302 

HRMT 470 - Human Resources Internship

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course provides students with the opportunity to practice on the job at an actual Human Resources department of a business organization for a period of six to seven weeks, thereby transferring and developing industry-specific and business skills acquired from prior study. Prerequisites: MGMT 302, HRMT 302, HRMT 304, MGMT 350

HRMT 499 - Research Project: HR Practitioner Case Study

Lecture:
6
Laboratory:
0
Total:
6

Case studies tell stories of real-life experiences and events that can influence decisions and practices. Develop an original case study analysis research project that identifies local and multinational key problems or challenges related to a diverse HRM topic.  Examine specific HR business case examples and use past course readings, outside research, resources, and tools to create best solutions. Also, reflect on knowledge and skills learned throughout the HRM program for the development of this real-world case study project. Analytical and communicational skills should be evident in this project. Guidance will be given to prepare and present a case study research project in both written and presentation form. Prerequisite(s): HRMT495

Major Electives (9 Credits)- Choose 3 courses:

MGMT 301 - Operations Management

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course involves an in-depth look at human behavior in organizations. Incorporating current management theory and research, the course explores the factors that influence individual and group performance. Topics may include perception, personality, attitudes, values, motivation, decision making, leadership, power and politics, conflict and negotiation, groups and culture. Prerequisite: MGMT 101

MGMT 306 - Cross-Cultural Management

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course introduces students to culture as an important variable in international management and examines its impact on organizations, strategy, negotiations, management of human capital, leadership, team building, and ethics. The course content includes a metaphor approach to explore key differences among cultures and examine their relevance for international management practice. Prerequisites: MGMT 301 and MGMT 305

HRMT 305 - Role of an HR Practitioner and Leader

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

Exemplary HR leaders are known for being forward-thinking, strong communicators and collaborators, ethical, quick problem-solvers, innovative, and having strong conflict management and relationship skills. Learn the functions of HR practitioners and leaders, differences between generalist and specialist roles in small, midsize, and large corporations, and how they contribute to a company's success. Explore how organizational psychology theories and social sciences build the foundation for understanding human behavior, workplace productivity, and employee satisfaction. Prerequisite(s): PSYC101, MGMT205, MGMT302 

HRMT 406 - International HRM

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

Today, managing across borders is more common than not and requires effective communication, collaboration, and relationship management skills. Develop a critical understanding of human resources management’s role in an international context. Topics covered include the recruitment and selection of expatriates, performance management, and reward systems in a multinational context. Case studies are explored for the better understanding of realistic problems in international HRM. Discover skillsets and talents needed to prepare future HR managers for the challenges of multiculturalism and global issues in the modern workplace. Prerequisite(s): MGMT302

HRMT 407 - Managing Change and Innovation

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

Organizations constantly experience change to improve business strategies and stay competitive in the workforce. Managing change requires a road map and pro-active creative solutions to be effective. Learn various conceptual change management frameworks and gain an understanding of best practices related to developing, implementing, and managing both large- and small-scale change initiatives, both as an internal change agent and as an organizational development consultant. Prerequisite(s): MGMT302 

Professional Elective Options (9 Credits)

Students pursuing a BBA in Human Resource Management must complete a minimum of 9 Professional Elective credits. Professional Elective credits may be earned via any courses offered at or above the 200 level