Skip to main content

Why Mechanical Engineering (ME)?

Mechanical Engineering is an international and diverse career path that can be applied in leadership positions across a various industries. This practical and multifaceted program develops students’ passion for design while building skillsets that can be applied in many areas such as aerospace, architecture, automotive, machinery, healthcare and artificial intelligence

Who Should Apply?                        

This four-year undergraduate program enables students to design processes and manage systems while fostering the ability to apply math and science principles to solve problems related to moving objects. Applicants should have strong practical and analytical skills with a basic interest and curiosity towards discovery of how every-day objects function.

Program Content

This program combines practical and management skills to encourage analytical thinking and problem solving. The core curriculum is built on a broad foundation of calculus and physics modules with focus on computer programming, methods of analysis and engineering design. It further advances to incorporate electrical engineering, advanced use of CAD software, engineering mechanics and simulated systems. Key principles are explored in detail, including thermodynamics, fluid mechanics and advanced design of machinery.

Elective modules are offered across may areas of interest, such as continuum mechanics, solar energy or biomechanics, to ensure that students are able to nurture interests as the course develops. Students are given the opportunity to undertake an internship with one of our partner companies, preparing work-ready graduates to successfully adapt in the workplace.

Program requirements

Program name Total Number of Credits
Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering
132
Credits

Course information

English Requirements (9 credits)

ENGL 101 - Composition I

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course is an overview of expository writing, including the development and revision of paragraphs and essays using various rhetorical strategies, as well as reading and discussion of selected essays, short stories and poems. In addition, the course introduces writing about literature, incorporation and documentation of material from primary sources.

ENGL 102 - Composition II

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course introduces the conventions of research writing and teaches the process of producing well-planned research papers using critical thinking and analytical skills in response to a variety of academic texts. The course is designed to provide guidance in all steps of the research process including choosing a topic, designing a research methodology, analyzing data, and writing up and presenting results.

Prerequisite: ENGL 101

ENGL 205 - Business English

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course emphasizes on techniques for communicating successfully through sound, honest written and oral business messages. The content is directed primarily to careers that involve precise writing skills, as well as general strategies involved in job related functions.

Arab Heritage Requirements (6 credits)

ARHG 101 - Arab Heritage I - Language

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course aims at developing the language skills of native speakers of Arabic, by providing the students with a comprehensive knowledge of the linguistic system. It is intended to help students attain proficiency by expanding vocabulary and providing paragraph-level activities in reading, writing, and speaking; through a selection texts by writers from across the Arab world.

ARHG 102 - Arab Heritage II - Modern History of Bahrain

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course introduces the spatial character and history of Bahrain, including the ancient and Islamic eras, and Arabic and Islamic dimensions of the identity of Bahrain  until the modern state and the development of the constitutional life in Bahrain, it also presents the philosophy of citizenship and the fundamental values of Bahrain’s society and citizenship rights ,duties and responsibilities.

Mathematics Requirements (6 credits)

MATH 151 - Calculus I

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course introduces functions limits and continuity, derivatives of functions of one variable, application of the derivative, related rates, maximum and minimum values, the mean value theorem, the integral and indefinite integrals and integration rules, inverse functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, inverse trigonometric functions, hyperbolic functions, and L’Hospital’s rule. 

MATH 152 - Calculus II

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course involves the applications and techniques of integration, including integration by substitution, integration by parts and integration by partial fractions, application of integration, parametric equations and polar coordinates, convergence of sequences and series, Power Series and approximation using Taylor Series.

Prerequisite: MATH 151

Science Requirements (8 credits)

CHEM 101 - General Chemistry 1

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
1
Total:
4

This course introduces the general principles of chemistry with emphasis on inorganic materials.  This course will provide students with a comprehensive overview of the major areas of chemistry.  The topics covered range from the atomic theory to the descriptions of chemical reactivity and reactions, quantitative methods in chemistry, reactions in aqueous media and chemical bonding. Prerequisites: High school chemistry and 2 years of high school algebra.

PHYS 101 - Principles of Physics

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course will provide students with a comprehensive overview of the some of the major areas of physics. Topics covered range from measurements and error analysis of physical dimensions to understand the concepts of motions and forces in one, two and three dimensions, free fall acceleration, kinetic, potential and conservation of energy.

Prerequisites: MATH 151

CHEM 201L - General Chemistry I Laboratory

Lecture:
1
Laboratory:
1
Total:
2

This course introduces students to laboratory and measurement techniques commonly used in chemistry laboratories. Techniques include mass and volume measurements, qualitative and quantitative analysis, volumetric analysis, thermochemistry, inorganic synthesis and spectrophotometric analysis.

Prerequisites: High school chemistry and 2 years of high school algebra

Social Science Requirements (9 credits)

ARHG 103 - Global Human Rights

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course introduces the basic principles and the definition of human rights with an emphasis on the International Convention of human rights. It aims to reflect current developments and questions arising in international human rights law, to communicate debates and arguments concerning human rights, and to analyze the application of international human rights principles in the context of Bahrain.

PSYC 100 - Introduction to Psychology

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

Psychology is a field focused on scientifically understanding how humans think, feel, and act. This course will introduce you to the basic concepts and research within the field of psychology and hopefully it will allow you to gain a better understanding of the self and others. The course will cover a wide range of topics such as research methodology, biological bases of behavior, perception, motivation and emotion, learning and memory, development, intelligence, personality and social influence.

SOSC 100 - Introduction to Sociology

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course provides a broad overview of sociology and how it applies to everyday life. Major theoretical perspectives and concepts are presented, including sociological imagination, culture, deviance, inequality, social change, and social structure. Students also explore the influence of social class and social institutions, such as churches, education, healthcare, government, economy, and environment. The family as a social structure is also examined.

Core Requirements (17 credits)

CIVL 200 - Engineering Mechanics – Statics

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course is an introduction to the concept of modeling and basic principles of rigid bodies, equivalent systems of forces, equilibrium of rigid bodies, analysis of planar rigid body systems, distributed forces, normal and shear forces and moment diagrams, and virtual work principle. Prerequisite: PHYS 101

CMPE 160 - Introduction to Computer Programming and Applications

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course introduces computer organization and operation. Topics include binary representation of information, fundamentals of computer programming using a C family language, data types, selection and iteration structures, functions, arrays, pointers, scope and duration of variables and the systematic design and development of computer programs.

ENGR 201 - Methods of Analysis

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course involves selected analytical and numerical methods for solving problems from various engineering fields: Solution of initial and boundary value problems, series solutions, Laplace transforms, and nonlinear equations; numerical methods for solving ordinary differential equations, accuracy of numerical methods, linear stability theory, and finite differences. This course also introduces a programming basic tool for computation problems with engineering applications.

Prerequisite: MATH 151

MATH 252 - Calculus III

Lecture:
4
Laboratory:
0
Total:
4

This course emphasizes on vector functions (continuity, derivatives, and integrals), parametric curves and surfaces, polar coordinates, as well as functions of several variables (including continuity and partial derivatives, gradient, directional derivatives). Topics also include the chain rule, double and triple integrals, iterated integrals, integration using polar, cylindrical, and spherical coordinates, change of variables, line and surface integrals (including surface area), curl and divergence, and the integral theorems of Green, Stokes, and Gauss. Prerequisites: MATH 151 and MATH 152

PHYS 102 - Principles of Physics II

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

The course provides an overview of the fundamental principles of physics in areas of electricity and magnetism. Topics include electric field, Gauss law, electric potential, capacitance and dielectrics, current and resistance, direct current circuits, magnetic fields, sources of magnetic fields, Faraday’s law, inductance, alternating current circuits, and electromagnetic waves. The course is designed for students requiring calculus-based physics. Prerequisites: MATH 152 and PHYS 101

Major Requirements (68 credits)

ELEC 204 - Principles of Electrical Engineering

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course focuses on circuit analysis, phasor diagrams, single-phase and three-phase power, semiconductor devices and applications, and energy conversion devices. (This course is not open to electrical or computer engineering majors.)

Prerequisites: MATH 152 and PHYS 102

MECH 101 - Solid Modeling I

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course focuses on computer-aided solid modeling, including engineering documentation, dimensioning and tolerancing per ASME Y14.5M-1004. Elementary sketching and dimensioning of orthographic and pictorial drawings and sections are also discussed.

MECH 102 - Solid Modeling II

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course is a continuation of MECH 101. It mainly focuses on more advanced applications of the CAD software.

Prerequisite: MECH 101

MECH 220 - Engineering Mechanics - Dynamics

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course investigates the dynamics of particles, including rectilinear and curvilinear motion, Newton's laws, and momentum and angular momentum methods. Topics also include work and energy, dynamics of rigid bodies, kinematics, Euler's Laws and angular momentum. Prerequisite: CIVL 200

MECH 240 - Introduction to Engineering Materials

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course focuses on the atomic and molecular structure of materials utilized in engineering. The content also analyzes the relationships between structure of materials and mechanical, thermal, electrical, corrosion and radiation properties. Applications of material structure relevant to civil, electrical, aerospace, and mechanical engineering are also introduced.

Prerequisite: CHEM 101; Concurrent: CIVL 200

MECH 240L - Materials Laboratory

Lecture:
0
Laboratory:
1
Total:
1

This course introduces students to experimental methods used to characterize engineering materials and mechanical behavior.

Concurrent: MECH 240

CIVL 301 - Introduction to Solid Mechanics

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course introduces students to the mechanics of solid deformable bodies. It presents various analytical methods for determining strength, stiffness and stability of load-carrying members.

Prerequisite: CIVL 200

MECH 310 - Introduction to Engineering Design

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course introduces a professional approach to engineering design problems. The course content focuses on problem definition, information gathering, feasibility studies, analysis, final design and communication. Several design studies and projects are also introduced. The course requires filing an approved master plan with the department chair.

Prerequisites: MECH 102 and MECH 220

MECH 312 - Simulation of Engineering Systems

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course introduces students to the concepts of modeling, simulation and analysis of various mechanical systems, including dynamic, vibrational, electromechanical, thermodynamic, fluidic and circuits for monitoring and controlling mechanical systems.

Prerequisites: CIVL 301, ELEC 204, ENGR 201, MECH 350, and MECH 360

MECH 314 - Engineering Design: Mechanical Components

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course involves the application of mechanics, physical properties of materials and solid mechanics to the design of machine elements.

Prerequisites: CIVL 301, MECH 102 ,ELEC 204, ENGR 201, and MECH 220.

MECH 330L - Control Systems Laboratory

Lecture:
0
Laboratory:
1
Total:
1

This course introduces students to control theory (e.g. stability, feedback, PID control) with applications in microprocessor-based control of dynamic, vibrational and mechatronic systems. "Bread-boarding" and BASIC programming of microcontrollers as well as graphical programming of PC-based controller interfaces are also discussed.

Prerequisites: ELEC 204, ENGR 201, MECH 203, and MECH 220

MECH 340 - Materials, Manufacturing and Design

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course provides an overview of the effects of fabrication and thermomechanical processing on the properties and service behavior of engineering materials. Topics covered consist of fracture mechanics and materials behavior under a range of design conditions, as well as designing criteria for engineering materials, including fatigue and creep.

Prerequisites: CIVL 301, MECH 240, and MECH 240L

MECH 350 - Thermodynamics

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course provides an overview of basic concepts and principles of thermodynamics with emphasis on simple compressible substances. First and second law analysis, entropy, exergy analysis, and state relations are also analysed.

Prerequisites: CIVL 200 and MATH 252

MECH 351 - Engineering Thermodynamics

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course introduces students to the analysis and design of gas and vapor power cycles as well as refrigeration systems. The topics covered in this course include generalized property relations for gases and gas-vapor, air-conditioning, combustion and chemical equilibrium, design of engineering systems and processes.

Prerequisite: MECH 350; Concurrent: MECH 360

MECH 360 - Fluid Mechanics

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course provides an overview of dimensional analysis with applications. Topics covered also include fluid statics and applications, integral and differential mass, energy and momentum balances, laminar and turbulent flow of Newtonian fluids, as well as flow measurements.

Prerequisite: PHYS 102

MECH 360L - Fluid Mechanics Laboratory

Lecture:
1
Laboratory:
0
Total:
1

This course introduces students to the experimental methods used to characterize fluid mechanics and behavior.

Prerequisite/concurrent: MECH 360

MECH 405 - Mechanical Engineering Internship

Lecture:
6
Laboratory:
0
Total:
6

This course provides students with the opportunity to practice on the job at a mechanical engineering firm or mechanical engineering department of an organization for a period of six to seven weeks, thereby transferring and developing industry-specific, mechanical engineering and other skills acquired from prior study.

Prerequisite: Junior standing

MECH 452 - Principles of Heat Transfer

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course focuses on the analytical and numerical solutions of steady and transient one and two-dimensional conduction problems, forced and natural convection in external and internal flows, as well as thermal radiation.

Prerequisites: MECH 350 and MECH 360

MECH 490L - Mechanical and Thermal Systems Laboratory

Lecture:
0
Laboratory:
1
Total:
1

This course introduces students to data acquisition theory, instrumentation, sensors, data reduction, statistical and uncertainty analysis, and experiment design. The concepts of designing, performing and reporting experiments on mechanical and thermal systems, mechanisms, vibrations, structures, thermodynamics, and heat transfer are also introduced.

Prerequisites: MECH 310, MECH 330, MECH 351, and MECH 452

MECH 495A - Mechanical Engineering Design: Capstone Project I

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course introduces and analyzes the application of engineering principles and design techniques to the designing, building, and testing of an engineering system. Furthermore, ethics related to engineering practice are discussed. A single project is completed in this two-course sequence, which requires the presentation of an oral and a written report.

Prerequisites: MECH 310, MECH 312, MECH 314, MECH 330, MECH 340, MECH 351, and MECH 452

MECH 496 - Advanced Machine Design

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course focuses on the application of advanced mechanics of materials to the design and analysis of mechanical elements. Topics covered in the course also include probabilistic design and finite element methods as well as applications. Design projects involve extensive use of finite element programs.

Prerequisites: MECH 314 and MECH 340

MECH 498 - Thermal System Analysis and Design

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course provides students with knowledge on analysis, design and optimization of thermal systems, using microcomputers. Topics covered also include modeling of thermal systems and components, thermal system component characteristics and the effect on overall system performance, the relationship among thermal sciences in the design process, and an introduction to thermo-economic optimization.

Prerequisites: MECH 351 and MECH 452

MECH 495B - Engineering Design: Capstone Project II

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course introduces and analyzes the application of engineering principles and design techniques to the designing, building, and testing of an engineering system. Furthermore, ethics related to engineering practice are discussed. A single project is completed in this two-course sequence, which requires the presentation of an oral and a written report.

Prerequisites: MECH 490, MECH 495A, and MECH 514

Major Electives (9 credits)

MECH 210 - Materials Science

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course focuses on materials and properties. Topics also include atomic bonding and arrangements, structural imperfections, atom movements, deformation of materials, physical properties, industrial alloys, modification of properties of materials through changes in structure, and nonmetallic materials. (This course is for non-mechanical engineering students.)

Prerequisite: CHEM 101

MECH 352 - Continuum Mechanics

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course mainly focuses on the mechanics of continua, stress tensor, deformation and flow, constitutive relations and applications to common solids and fluids.

Prerequisites: CIVL 301 and MECH 312.

MECH 355 - Introduction to Mechanical Vibrations

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course analyzes the concept of mechanical vibration. Topics covered also include single- and multi-degree of freedom systems, free and forced vibrations, vibration isolation, vibration absorbers and theory of vibration measuring instruments.

Prerequisites: MECH 312

MECH 357 - Automatic Control Systems

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

The course introduces students to the dynamic characteristics of control components and systems. Stability and response of closed-loop systems and design of control systems are also covered.

MECH 365 - Nonmetallic Materials

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course introduces the fundamentals of ceramics, polymers and composite materials. Topics covered also include materials design and selection, statistical methods of brittle materials design (appropriate for ceramic materials), rheological modeling of polymeric materials, and stress and strain analysis using classical lamination theory of multiply composite laminates.

Prerequisites: MECH 314 and MECH 340

MECH 368 - Powder-Based Manufacturing

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course teaches students about the manufacturing of micro and nanostructured engineering components and composites, starting with metal and/or ceramic powders. Topics covered also include powder production methods, characterization, powder shaping and compaction, sintering, hot consolidation, design considerations and finishing operations.

Prerequisite: MECH 340

MECH 408 - Computer-Aided Manufacturing

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course introduces students to the concepts of computer-controlled manufacturing and assembly techniques and devices, databases and special languages, as well as agile manufacturing software programs and technologies.

Prerequisites: ENGR 201, MECH 102, MECH 314, and MECH 340

MECH 410 - Heating, Ventilating and Air-Conditioning

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course presents the fundamentals of air conditioning processes, psychometrics and building cooling-load calculations. Topics covered also include design and analysis of HVAC systems, equipment selection, design codes and standards and computerized cooling-load calculations.

Prerequisites: MECH 351 and MECH 452

MECH 415 - Solar Energy Conversion

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course involves the application of thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, and heat transfer to the thermal design of solar energy conversion systems. Computer simulations are also presented and used.

Prerequisites: MECH 351 and MECH 452

MECH 420 - Biomechanics

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course teaches students about the application of engineering methodologies for quantitative understanding of biological/physiological phenomena. Topics covered also include continuum mechanics principles, cardiovascular systems and components viewed from a mechanistic standpoint.

Prerequisites: CIVL 301 and MECH 360

MECH 425 - Fundamentals of Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems

Lecture:
3
Laboratory:
0
Total:
3

This course focuses on microfabrication techniques, microsensors and micro-actuators, and scaling laws. A design project of a microdevice, including schematic creation, test of performance, layout generation, and layout versus schematic comparison, is required.

Prerequisites: MECH 220, and MECH 240